Roughly half of B.C’s old-growth forests are protected.

The bio-diverse landscape covers 32,000 square kilometers which accounts for 5% of the province’s forested area.

Now, Wildsight Conservation Director John Bergenske says he wants to ensure that all old-growth forest remain protected.

“We are in the midst of both a climate and biodiversity crisis,” writes Bergenske. “With rising land and ocean temperatures, and up to one million species at risk of extinction. Conserving and restoring forests, wetlands and other natural ecosystems are important steps to help fight back against these crises.”

Bergenske says old-growth forests in the Kootenays are at risk and so he is asking the public to fill out this government survey to halt the ongoing logging of these ancient forests.

“The current logging of old growth forest in BC is well beyond what science recommends to maintain healthy ecosystems. We must manage our forests in a way that accounts for their importance in addressing climate change and to reverse the dramatic losses of wildlife and plant communities.”

Bergenske explains.

“Right now, the government is holding a consultation on the future of old growth forest management in the province—your comments can make a real difference. The consultation period is open until January 31, 2020.”

In a poll commissioned by Sierra Club BC, 92% of British Columbians were in favour of protecting old growth forests.

“Making changes to the Act is essential to strengthen government’s oversight of the forest sector and to restore public trust in how our forests and range lands are managed. We also need to make sure FRPA is positioned to help the Province adapt natural resource management to the effects of climate change. This work supports modernization of land use planning, renewal of forest policy province-wide and improvement of wildlife management and habitat conservation. It also advances reconciliation with B.C.’s Indigenous nations communities,” writes Doug Donaldson, BC’s Minister of Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development.

Follow this link to Bergenske’s full article at Wildsight.ca